Tag Archive: rightwing politics


on February 16, 2016 in World News

Donald Trump has invented a new way to win

By Mark Cunningham The other GOP candidates are finally starting to fight on Donald Trump’s terms, to judge by the slugfest that was Saturday night’s debate. But it speaks volumes — whole encyclopedias — about the ignorance of our political and media elites that they’re only now realizing that much of what Trump’s been doing is just busting balls. It’s a blue-collar ritual, with clear rules — overtly insulting, sure, but with infinite subtleties. It can be a test of manliness, a sign of respect, a way of bonding and much more. Rule No. 1: You can wince, but...

By Mark Cunningham The other GOP candidates are finally starting to fight on Donald Trump’s terms, to judge by the slugfest that was Saturday night’s debate. But it speaks volumes — whole encyclopedias — about the ignorance of our...

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on February 16, 2016 in World News

Detectives question lack of autopsy in Scalia death

By Jamie Schram and Bob Fredericks Veteran homicide investigators in New York and Washington, DC, on Monday questioned the way local and federal authorities in Texas handled the death of Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia. “It’s not unreasonable to ask for an autopsy in this case, particularly knowing who he is,” retired Brooklyn homicide Detective Patricia Tufo told The Post. “He’s not at home. There are no witnesses to his death, and there was no reported explanation for why a pillow is over his head,” Tufo said. “So I think under the circumstances it’s not unreasonable to request an...

By Jamie Schram and Bob Fredericks Veteran homicide investigators in New York and Washington, DC, on Monday questioned the way local and federal authorities in Texas handled the death of Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia. “It’s not unreasonable to...

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on February 16, 2016 in World News

Ohio activist’s suicide spotlights depression among Black Lives Matter leaders

‘My demons won today’: Ohio activist’s suicide spotlights depression among Black Lives Matter leaders By Wesley Lowery and Kevin Stankiewicz A solemn group stood in the shadow of the statehouse in Columbus, Ohio, forming a circle on the snow-caked sidewalk. MarShawn McCarrel, 23, a well-known Black Lives Matter activist, had taken his own life on the statehouse steps. Now his friends had come together in his memory. As evening turned to night last week, protest organizer Rashida Davison, 25, recounted the personal toll of two years of activism: Trouble sleeping. Bouts of anxiety. Feelings of despair. “This is really getting to us,”...

‘My demons won today’: Ohio activist’s suicide spotlights depression among Black Lives Matter leaders By Wesley Lowery and Kevin Stankiewicz A solemn group stood in the shadow of the statehouse in Columbus, Ohio, forming a circle on the snow-caked sidewalk. MarShawn...

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on February 16, 2016 in World News

Be wary when politicians talk about diversification

Rob Breakenridge, for the Calgary Herald More from Rob Breakenridge, for the Calgary Herald It’s rather strange to see how Alberta has found a new role as B.C.’s whipping boy.  Last week’s speech from the throne on the West  Coast took a handful of gratuitous shots at Alberta, fresh on the heels of B.C. Premier Christy Clark vowing to oppose yet another pipeline to tidewater. Apparently, Clark sees great political value in standing guard against creeping Albertaism. Alberta is certainly not above criticism. However, if we’re to serve as a lasting monument to “how not to do things,” let’s not...

Rob Breakenridge, for the Calgary Herald More from Rob Breakenridge, for the Calgary Herald It’s rather strange to see how Alberta has found a new role as B.C.’s whipping boy.  Last week’s speech from the throne on the West...

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on February 15, 2016 in World News

Pipeline projects need ‘indigenous licence’, says AFN National Chief

Some pipeline projects should be allowed to proceed if they have an “indigenous licence” according to the National Chief of the Assembly of First Nations.​ “We need to make sure that there is, I call this the indigenous licence, not just social but indigenous licence,” Perry Bellegarde told Chris Hall on CBC Radio’s The House. Pipeline projects to face new environmental regulations The AFN hosted its First Nations Forum on Energy this week in Vancouver to allow First Nations leaders, politicians, environmentalists and key industry players to talk about how to develop some of the country’s natural resources Perry Bellegarde’s language about major energy projects now...

Some pipeline projects should be allowed to proceed if they have an “indigenous licence” according to the National Chief of the Assembly of First Nations.​ “We need to make sure that there is, I call this the indigenous licence,...

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on February 15, 2016 in World News

Libs outspent Tories in first 100 days

  By David Akin  In its first 100 days in office, the majority government of Stephen Harper handed out about $4 billion worth of grants, loans, or other spending commitments. Justin Trudeau’s Liberals, though, topped that in their first 100 days in office by more than a billion dollars. From its swearing-in on May 18, 2011 to August 26, 2011, the Harper government distributed 443 cheques worth a combined $3.9 billion. From its swearing-in on Nov. 4, 2015 to Feb 12, 2016, the Trudeau government distributed 208 cheques worth a combined $5.3 billion. The biggest cheques the Trudeau government...

  By David Akin  In its first 100 days in office, the majority government of Stephen Harper handed out about $4 billion worth of grants, loans, or other spending commitments. Justin Trudeau’s Liberals, though, topped that in their first...

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on February 15, 2016 in World News

Should the government step in to save Canadian media?

Carleton School of Journalism’s Susan Harada and Jane Hilderman of Samara join Tom Clark to discuss the demise of the news business and its effect on civil discourse. By Monique Muise News outlets across the country are imploding. From print to radio and television, the story is the same: revenues are going down, journalists are losing jobs as the industry becomes more concentrated. But even as these traditional outlets wither, there has been an explosion of information online, and it has never been more accessible. So what does this all mean for democracy? And is it time for the federal government to...

Carleton School of Journalism’s Susan Harada and Jane Hilderman of Samara join Tom Clark to discuss the demise of the news business and its effect on civil discourse. By Monique Muise News outlets across the country are imploding. From...

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on February 15, 2016 in World News

Tough times ahead for Trudeau Libs in Senate, say Liberal Senators

By ABBAS RANA | Prime Minister Justin Trudeau could have a tough time getting legislation through the Upper Chamber because the government does not have a Senate caucus, the majority Conservatives are in opposition and Senate Liberals still feel jilted after being unceremoniously booted out of the national Liberal caucus in 2014 with some, now, saying they don’t “owe anything” to the prime minister. “In the old days, there probably would be a majority of Liberal Senators who would support government legislation, but we’re not living in that era anymore and that exercising this freedom is actually a very positive thing,” Liberal Senate...

By ABBAS RANA | Prime Minister Justin Trudeau could have a tough time getting legislation through the Upper Chamber because the government does not have a Senate caucus, the majority Conservatives are in opposition and Senate Liberals still feel jilted after being unceremoniously...

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on February 15, 2016 in Right Edition Videos

Politics and the Media – Effeminate Liberals

Conservatives Are Right: The Media Is Very Liberal And the thing is, conservatives have a point. Study after study has shown that the mainstream media leans left, and that, as economists Tim Groseclose and Jeff Milyo have written, “an almost overwhelming fraction of journalists are liberal.” The extent of this bias, of course, depends on what your definitions of liberal and conservative. And the media has other, arguably more important, biases: towards controversy and producing content that is profitable. But it is safe to say that the median journalist in America is to the left of the median American...

Conservatives Are Right: The Media Is Very Liberal And the thing is, conservatives have a point. Study after study has shown that the mainstream media leans left, and that, as economists Tim Groseclose and Jeff Milyo have written, “an...

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on February 15, 2016 in World News

United Nations warns UK Government to ‘stop tasering children’

By Refreshing News The United Nations will condemn and publicly shame the Government in May for allowing police to use 50,000-volt stun guns on children, as well as stopping and searching toddlers. The Government faces a six-hour grilling in Switzerland over the extent of its compliance with the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child, which the UK signed in 1990 and ratified the following year. The last time the UK was measured up against the convention, in 2008, the UN said that it wanted England and Wales to treat “Taser guns and AEPs [attenuating energy projectiles] as weapons… View Article

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